Monthly Archives: September 2010

Steamed Fish

One of the simplest and purest way to cook fish is to steam it. It works best with the freshest fish you can find and with limited amount of time and perpetual laziness.

All you need is salt, ginger, green onions, and a splash of Chinese cooking wine.

I didn’t even have a steamer. I put a plate inside a very large cast iron pan filled with about half an inch of water but then it was a pain, literally, to remove the plate after the fish is done. I do not really recommend it, but if you have no choice, feel free to improvise with whatever pots and pans you have. Just make sure that the rim of the plate you use doesn’t block steam from rising with in the pot, or pan.

Step one, cut the ginger and green onion into strips.

Step two, salt the fish.

Step three, sprinkle the ginger and green onion strips onto fish.

Step four, splash some Chinese cooking wine on top. Not too much, you don’t want a drunken fish. Ha. Bad. Yes.

Step five, steam for about 10-15 minutes. I start counting time when the water begins to boil and steam begins to leak out of the side of the pot.

Step six, don’t burn yourself taking the plate out.

So hard right?

You can really taste the fish this way, and the aromatics are just right. Bon appetit!

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Filed under Chinese, Dinner, Seafood

Brunch at Bistro Fruit Folie

Last year we stumbled upon a neat little place on rue St. Denis in Montreal. We had awesome burgers at very reasonable prices with a waitress with the biggest smile we’ve ever seen. Apparently the smiles weren’t just a one-time thing. Last week I went there with Ian after church for brunch and our waitress had more 100-watt smiles waiting for us.

Excellent, excellent service.

And of course, excellent, excellent food.

I ordered the crepes with three flours, one of which I suspect is buckwheat. It was supposed to come with fruit, but I had no idea that it was going to come with so much fruit! And nicely cut fruit too! The crepes were rolled around breakfast sausages and topped with a bit of swiss cheese. I had to feed Ian half my fruit to be able to finish it all.

That was all for like, six bucks. Tell me, where in Montreal can you find an awesome breakfast like that in Montreal?

I got the orange pekoe and made my own Asian milk tea. That gave me a big smile, which I returned to the waitress, who came by no less than three times to see if we were okay.

If you get a chance, go eat breakfast/lunch/brunch at the Bistro Fruit Folie at 3817 rue St. Denis in Montreal.

I just love brunch! 😀

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Filed under Bakery/Restaurant Reviews, Breakfast, Lunch

Cinnamon Sugar Rugalach

I made this a while ago, right before I came back to school. I had some leftover dough from the last time I made chocolate pecan rugalach. The dough freezes incredibly well, just thaw overnight in the refrigerator and you’re good to go.

This filling couldn’t be easier either. Just mix 4 Tbsp. softened butter with 1 Tbsp. cinnamon and about 1/2 c. brown sugar. Spread this mixture on rolled out rectangular dough and roll up jelly style. Cut and bake at 375 for 10 minutes and 350 for a further 5, until browned and gooey. Great treats to share! And cute as snails.

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Filed under Pastries, Snacks

Fresh Tomato Bruschetta

On Saturday I went to the Farmer’s market in Ste. Anne with Ian. I bought this strange looking sandwich thing. I am not entirely sure what it’s called. It looks like a great big kernel of wheat. See?

I only know that it is made of home-ground whole wheat flour and baked. And it’s filled with a mixture of lentils, carrots, tofu curds, green peppers, chili peppers, red peppers, and is almost fat-free. I also know that it’s awfully tasty and filling.

We went to a marvelous and charming little cafe in town, called Twigs. They have the most innovative sandwiches I’ve ever seen or heard of. Alligator sandwich, anyone? They also have excellent espresso, which has become my treat reserved for Saturdays.

Anyways, we also picked up a baguette at the market. Very delicious bread with a crunchy crust and a chewey inside. That is, if you eat it on the same day. Which we didn’t. So what happened to the bread? It got hard and dry, blame it on the Montreal weather. It has been very cold these past few days. I even broke out winter boots. Yes, winter boots in September.

In efforts to resuscitate the baguette, I made bruschetta! (Was going to make baked french toast but forgot…)

Simple ingredients. Easy dish. Elegant look. Wonderful taste. Read on for the recipe.

Oh, did I mention that Ian is learning to cook? I didn’t? Oops. Well, it seems that his first lesson is knife skills, seeing as he made salad today with boiled eggs. (If your boiled eggs always have the icky bluish-greenish sulfur ring, follow this trick: bring eggs to a full boil for 2 minutes ONLY, then cover and let sit for 10 minutes, rinse with cold water and peel. I guarantee perfect eggs every time.)

Doesn’t the olive oil and balsamic vinegar look like the perfect couple approaching each other shyly? No? Okay, maybe it’s just me. 😉

Note: Rubbing the garlic on the toast gives just enough garlicky-goodness without visible, or overwhelming chunks of garlic. Enjoy.

Fresh Tomato Bruschetta
serves 3-4

1/2 lb. fresh tomatoes
5-6 fresh basil leaves, cut into chiffonade, or fine strips
dash of onion salt, to taste
pepper to taste
1/4 c. extra-virgin olive oil
1 clove garlic, cut in half crosswise
1/2 of a day-old baguette, sliced

  1. Place the baguette slices on a baking tray and dry in 250 degree oven until crisp, about 20 minutes, or more if your bread is more fresh.
  2. Chop the tomatoes and combine with the rest of the ingredients except for the garlic. Set aside.
  3. Rub one side of each toast with the garlic and top with tomato mixture.
  4. Eat.

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Filed under Appetizers, Side dishes, Vegetarian